LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT

LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT AT ITSC

We believe that good people make our business, and that’s why we encourage our employees to unleash their full potential by engaging in continuous learning.

At ITSC we believe, we win together.  We provide a variety of opportunities for your personal and professional growth. 


"If you could get the people in an organization rowing in the same direction, you could dominate any industry, in any market, against any competition, at any time."

Patrick Lecioni

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AT ITSC

Performance management is a collaborative, ongoing process between managers and employees. There are three main components of the process: goal setting, continuous feedback, and performance documentation.

Exempt employees will complete annual goal-setting activities and will receive year-end appraisals.

Review the suggested timeline below and reach out to the Human Resources Department with concerns and questions. 

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL TIMELINE

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January

Previous year self-appraisals are due

Leveling sessions occur

Supervisors review PMP with direct reports

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February

Begin previous year formal Performance Management conversations

Merit increases are set and retroactive to Jan. 1

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July/August

Mid-year formal check-in meetings occur

Introduction and training for self-appraisals

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October/November

Performance Management training sessions occur

Leaders set goals for business units and gain approval

Goals are cascaded to direct reports

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December

Goals are finalized, entered, and approved in Dayforce

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March, April, May, June, and September

Informal performance conversations occur

FUNDAMENTALS OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

We have adopted a Performance Management (PM) system that aligns with our strategic plans and overall work culture. The fundamentals of Performance Management will:

1. Set Clear Performance Expectations
All goals and success metrics are relevant, consistent, timely, accurate, and challenging but achievable.

2. Ensure Transparent Performance Metrics
Goals and success metrics for performance should be visible to all.  This level of transparency increases awareness and accountability and allows everyone to assess progress.

3. Communicate often
There are two forms of consistent communication through the Performance Management process.  Informal—unscheduled, in the moment feedback on performance, and formal—set, structured time for more in-depth performance conversations occuring twice a year.

STEP 1:

  • Employee completes a self-evaluation and submits it to their manager

STEP 2:

  • Managers seek multiple sources of feedback to complete employees' appraisals

STEP 3:

  • Manager holds 1:1 meeting with employees

STEP 4:

  • Employee acknowledges appraisal in Dayforce

The overall rating is calculated based on each goal’s rating and weighting. While performance is an indicator of success, we want employees to achieve goals the right way.

  • Exceeds Expectations—Reserved for employees who demonstrate an exceptional level of performance and consistently exceed overall goals and objectives, generating an exceptional contribution.
  • Meets Expectations—This rating typically represents the majority of employees. A positive contribution to business results in line with the business plan is made, with the individual being stretched and challenged in doing so. Meets objectives and demonstrates appropriate performance.
  • Does Not Meet Expectations—Performance is below the standard expected of someone in the role, although individuals are likely to perform at an acceptable level in most areas. One or two areas of performance need to be addressed; development is needed to meet some objectives for the role.
  • N/A—The rating may be given to those who are new to a role and may not have had the opportunity to meet all of the required criteria (hired in the last quarter).
  • How-to Complete Self-Evaluation for Employees (pdf?)
  • How-to Complete Appraisals for Managers
  • How-to Create SMART Goals
  • Writing Goals and Examples
  • Feedback Resources
  • FAQ

Process for Annual Goal Setting

STEP 1:

  • Employees add goals in Dayforce from the ‘Performance Management’ page of their profile and submit them to their manager.

STEP 2:

  • Manager reviews and edits or approves the goals.

STEP 3:

  • Employees and managers can continue to add or edit goals throughout the year as needed.

GOAL SETTING

The following section will help everyone understand how to create SMART goals and complete annual goal-setting activities that align with our strategy.


Introduction to SMART Goals

This quick instructional video will help ITSC team members set SMART goals that align with the organization.


Guide to SMART Goals

We use the SMART methodology for shaping Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Relevant, and Timebound goals.

Specific goals clearly define the result or desired outcome, solving a problem, taking advantage of an opportunity, or meeting a challenge. Specific (i.e., What will you do?)

Administer Evaluate Support
Build Manage Generate
Coordinate Oversee Implement
Create Plan Maintain
Develop Produce Transition
Direct Provide Update
Establish Supervise Write


Increase process efficiency in the [X] business unit, generating a 10% savings in overhead costs. The business unit leader and operations manager will conduct a review of the operational area [X] and implementing process improvements before the end of Q1.
Goal Tip Sheet
Measurable goals demonstrate tangible progress towards your desired outcome. There are usually several short-term or benchmark measurements built into an annual plan. Measurable (i.e., How will you measure your goal?)

Amounts produced Feedback logs "Stakeholder" feedback
Audits, tests, inspections Observation Surveys
Automated reports Productivity rates Time saved
Costs reduced Quality/accuracy rates Turnaround time
Customer satisfaction Revenue generated Work products


Increase process efficiency in the [X] business unit, generating a 10% savings in overhead costs. The business unit leader and operations manager will conduct a review of the operational area [X] and implementing process improvements before the end of Q1.
Goal Tip Sheet
Actionable goals are challenging yet feasible and well defined. You must possess the appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities. (Remember your mid-year / annual review centers around your SMART Goals). Increase process efficiency in the [X] business unit, generating a 10% savings in overhead costs. The business unit leader and operations manager will conduct a review of the operational area [X] and implementing process improvements before the end of Q1.
Goal Tip Sheet
Relevant goals measure outcomes within the scope of our mission and strategy. Increase process efficiency in the [X] business unit, generating a 10% savings in overhead costs. The business unit leader and operations manager will conduct a review of the operational area [X] and implementing process improvements before the end of Q1.
Goal Tip Sheet
Time-Bound goals specify when you want to achieve your goal. Increase process efficiency in the [X] business unit, generating a 10% savings in overhead costs. The business unit leader and operations manager will conduct a review of the operational area [X] and implementing process improvements before the end of Q1.
Goal Tip Sheet



Goal Setting Requirements in Dayforce for Exempt Employees

Minimum Requirements:

  • Employees should submit at least four, no more than six SMART goals for approval. 
  • All employees must have an Individual Development Plan
  • Remember, goals are fluid.  As things change, you can update your goals at any time in the performance process due to business needs.

Goals: Step-By-Step Guide For Managers

The steps below are intended to help managers with the goal setting process.

1
Step 1: Performance planning
Leadership meets and defines the goals and priorities for the year. 
2
Step 2: Put your plans into action
Leaders breakdown the strategic direction and link goals with business plans. 
3
Step 3: Communicate & Cascade
Share goals and strategic direction and cascade to your teams.
4
Step 4: Refine & Define
Define what success looks like with your team based on strategy.
5
Step 5: Formalize & Follow-up
Review and approve individual employee's goals in  Dayforce

INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (IDP)

An individual development plan (IDP) is a tool to assist employees in career and personal development.  Its primary purpose is to help employees reach short and long-term career goals, all while addressing specific skill gaps.

An IDP should be viewed as a partnership between the employee and their manager.  This type of documentation involves preparation and continuous feedback.Creating your IDP is not something you should do alone.  In fact, it’s best to complete at the time of goal setting with the help of your manager. 

HOW TO CREATE YOUR INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (IDP)

Use the guide below to learn how to fill out an Individual Development Plan. Then, log in to Dayforce and submit your IDP. This will be routed to your manager for approval.

An IDP is a document that sums up your current career and goals. It should contain the following elements:

  • A development goal that is tied to your performance goal. Think “What skill do I need to develop?”
  • A purpose, what will your development goal achieve?
  • Action steps for achieving your goal. Dayforce is programmed to accept multiple, specific tasks for each goal. This will keep you on track all year long.
  • Success Measures, defining what success looks like.
  • A start and end date.

EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK MATTERS

Conversations matter. Feedback promotes personal and professional growth. The ability to give and receive effective feedback is an essential skill for all employees. 

EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK RESTS ON THREE UNDERLYING PRINCIPLES:

1

Feedback Takes Two
  • Effective feedback takes place only when people engage in a two-way conversation, speaking openly, and listening to one another.
2

Feedback Brings Reality Into Focus
  • Feedback is a dynamic process that brings people together, each with unique experiences, backgrounds, and points of view.
3

Feedback Takes Intention
  • To make feedback effective, you must genuinely want to help. Otherwise, the exchange will not be meaningful to either party, and could harm the relationship.

THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF FEEDBACK

It can be challenging for managers and employees to understand when and how frequently to have performance discussions outside of the formal performance review.

Here’s some tips for how to have informal performance conversations:

  • Informal conversations occur in the moment.
  • Feedback can also be positive. All types of conversations support performance.
  • Engage in holistic, two-way conversations.
  • Focus on supporting others.
  • Be willing to listen.

STEP 1: Identify the timing for informal performance conversations.

  • Informal conversations occur in the moment.
  • Feedback can also be positive. All types of conversations support performance.
  • Engage in holistic, two-way conversations.
  • Focus on supporting others.
  • Be willing to listen.


STEP 2: Review current work; discuss what is working well and where employees need additional support. Ask:

  • What do you feel most proud of?
  • What did you accomplish recently?
  • How can I help you?


STEP 3: Discuss current progress against goals (Remember to discuss both the WHAT and the HOW). Ask:

  • How is your work supporting our business strategy?
  • Are there things about your work you might change to better support our strategy?


STEP 4: Discuss barriers. Ask:

  • What was your biggest challenge?
  • What is getting in the way of doing your job?
  • What is the most frustrating barrier?
  • How is the most frustrating barrier?
  • How are changes affecting your work?


STEP 5: Discuss progress being made against development goals as well as any other development needs or concerns.

Formal feedback conversations include:

  • Employee performance conversations (i.e. annual performance management)
  • Are formally scheduled or highly structured meetings/events
  • Regular one-on-one conversations, between employees and managers
  • Corrective measures

Tips for formal performance conversations:

  • Check your motives – Before giving feedback, remind yourself why you are doing it. The purpose of giving feedback is to improve the situation or the person’s performance.
  • Prepare your comments – You don’t want to read a script, but you do need to be clear about what you will say. This will help you stay on track and stick to the issues.
  • Criticize in private – While public recognition is appreciated, public scrutiny is not. Establish a safe place to talk where you won’t be interrupted or overheard.
  • Use "I" statements – Give your feedback from your perspective. This way you avoid labeling, blaming or judging

A THRIVING LEARNING CULTURE

Performance and learning are linked, which is why we've invested in tools to help you grow your skills.  Request access to LinkedIn Learning for over 16,000+ online courses taught by real-world professionals.